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Latin America's Day of the Dead Celebration

Latin America039s Day of the Dead Celebration

Families gather around the graves of their loved ones at the Virgen de Lourdes cemetery in Lima, Peru (Rodrigo Abd/AP)

Dia de Los Muertos is celebrated in streets, homes, communities, universities, and parades often with large festivals including activities for children and adults. The "Day of the Dead" occurs on November 1 and 2 of each year, thus coinciding with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day.


(REUTERS/Mariana Bazo)


Dia de los Muertos or “The Day of the Dead” originated centuries ago in Mexico where it is still widely celebrated today. The blend of pre-Hispanic indigenous beliefs and Spanish Catholic beliefs are performed in honor of the dead. It is a festive, joyous time of celebration with loving rituals that are full of joy and remembrance.

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(REUTERS/David Mercado)

People around the world are drawn to the ideas and visuals of Mexico's Day of the Dead and the holiday continually gains in popularity as more people learn about it. During this time, South Americans also embrace their textiles by leaving them out so the dead can use them as blankets to rest after a long journey. It is common belief that the deceased return to their earthly homes to visit and rejoice with their loved ones during this time of the year.They're also used as picnic blankets for another common tradition of having a picnic at their loved ones' grave site.



Buy Authentic Textiles

Dia de los Muertos is celebrated as a way of cherishing connections with the unseen world. People around the world are drawn to the ideas and visuals of Mexico's Day of the Dead and the holiday continually gains in popularity as more people learn about it.


In celebration, we just recieved some awesome Guatemalan Mayan 'Day of the Dead' iconic sculptures at Diseno! They are hand-carved and painted, making each one unique, and cherishing the Latin holidays for a lifetime.

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 4 years ago

The Big Flea Invades New York City

The Big Flea Invades New York City

(All photos: Kaylei McGaw / Lonny)

The "Big Flea" comes to Manhattan's soaring Pier 94!

New York City’s largest indoor flea market to date, encompasses more than 600 booths that are spread over the Pier's 100,000+ square feet with vendors selling everything from antique furniture to collectible sterling silver. We even saw vintage Hermès handbags!

Below we have an inside view of the trends and treasures from the show:



Vintage Textiles / Pillows


Classic Bar Cart / Antique Pillows / Vintage Victorian Chair


Vintage Pottery / Picture Frames / Sculptures / Antique Silverware

New York City really digs design elements, after all they have always been the genesis of fashion and interior design. You’ll find everything at this flea market as long as it’s antique, ranging from $20 pieces to high-end antique dealers.



Check out the original article on Lonny.

Cheers,
Frank Campanale


updated: 4 years ago

Get the Look: A Statement Making Mud Room

Get the Look A Statement Making Mud Room

Photo by Patrick Cline/Lonny

In Hudson, Ohio this mudroom is impressive, flaunting a seriously stylish sitting/dining room with key design components:

  • Statement-making wall accents
  • Settee with a pop of color
  • Pared-down Midcentury pieces
  • Nature-inspired elements

This solicited look might seem complicated to pull off, but we've done the research for you and provided you with everything you need below!



Hand-crafted Midcentury Modern pendant light imported from Argentina





Natural Argentine cowhide rug



Custom round dining table



Vintage Textile Throws for a dash of subtle color



Patagonia Sheep Skin stool with wood base




Check out the Original article on Lonny


Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 4 years ago

Product of the Week: Handmade Organic Cotton Scarves made in Guatemala

Product of the Week Handmade Organic Cotton Scarves made in Guatemala

Help support a fair trade business whose mission is to provide social and economic opportunities to indigenous artisans in Guatemala.

Since we’ve been traveling to South America, the transformation of reality is evident in their social, economic, and cultural changes. We want to help establish a more sustainable world by building trust and working together with indigenous people’s cooperatives that produce high quality handmade textiles. We saw clearly devoted ability, reliability, and fairness attributed to the high quality production in Guatemala, so we are sure with your help these artisans can have a secure income and make a dignified living.


During our last stay at Casa Santo Domingo, Guatemala we visited some of the local textile artists. We were offered an irresistible  opportunity to watch them dye cotton and wool and they set up a gas stove and pot to give us a live demonstration of the process. The natural dyes are created for the fabric from Logwood chips that are steeped and drained for about 20 minutes. Then the large pieces of raw fabric are soaked in the natural dye and after just a few minutes, it turns to a very deep purple/black color. The raw fabrics were then left to hang for a number of hours. Once dry, it can be woven into a beautiful scarf, blanket, throw, or other textiles.


It is amazing to see the dying process in person since many Americans are far detached from the processes of production. They would be astonished, seeing the way society used to accomplish the task of fabrication before people were replaced with machinery. The quality of handmade goods remains unsurpassed and these beautiful 100% cotton scarves are surly no exception.

updated: 4 years ago

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