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Latin America's Day of the Dead Celebration

Latin America039s Day of the Dead Celebration

Families gather around the graves of their loved ones at the Virgen de Lourdes cemetery in Lima, Peru (Rodrigo Abd/AP)

Dia de Los Muertos is celebrated in streets, homes, communities, universities, and parades often with large festivals including activities for children and adults. The "Day of the Dead" occurs on November 1 and 2 of each year, thus coinciding with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day.


(REUTERS/Mariana Bazo)


Dia de los Muertos or “The Day of the Dead” originated centuries ago in Mexico where it is still widely celebrated today. The blend of pre-Hispanic indigenous beliefs and Spanish Catholic beliefs are performed in honor of the dead. It is a festive, joyous time of celebration with loving rituals that are full of joy and remembrance.

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(REUTERS/David Mercado)

People around the world are drawn to the ideas and visuals of Mexico's Day of the Dead and the holiday continually gains in popularity as more people learn about it. During this time, South Americans also embrace their textiles by leaving them out so the dead can use them as blankets to rest after a long journey. It is common belief that the deceased return to their earthly homes to visit and rejoice with their loved ones during this time of the year.They're also used as picnic blankets for another common tradition of having a picnic at their loved ones' grave site.



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Dia de los Muertos is celebrated as a way of cherishing connections with the unseen world. People around the world are drawn to the ideas and visuals of Mexico's Day of the Dead and the holiday continually gains in popularity as more people learn about it.


In celebration, we just recieved some awesome Guatemalan Mayan 'Day of the Dead' iconic sculptures at Diseno! They are hand-carved and painted, making each one unique, and cherishing the Latin holidays for a lifetime.

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Getting Experimental with Design

Getting Experimental with Design

Chiachio & Giannone, Ciudad Frondosa (2011-2012)Hand embroidery; cotton, rayon, wool. Museum purchase with funds provided by Nanette L. Laitman, 2014. Argentina.

New Territories refer to the state of making artistry in today’s globalized society, a phenomenon that has helped to spur a confluence of art, design, and craft. We examine and explore this trend as we travel through several South America cities.


DFC, Casual Dinnerware (2013), Orange Crush Fiberglass Wall Console (2013), Rosario Mirror (2013) Installation view at ICFF New York, 2013. Courtesy of the artist. Mexico. Photo by David Franco.


Collaborations between small manufacturing operations and craftspersons, artists, and designers demonstrate how the resulting work addresses not only the issues of commodification and production, but also of urbanization, displacement and sustainability.


“I really wanted to focus on young designers, because that’s where I saw new dialogue growing out of tradition and legacy.” -Lowery Stokes Sims

A number of key themes include the dialogue between contemporary trends and artistic legacies in Latin American art, the use of repurposed materials in strategies of upcycling, the blending of digital and traditional skills, and the reclamation of personal and public space.


Lucia Cuba, Artículo 6, from the series Artículo 6: Narratives of gender, strength and politics (2012-2014) Cotton canvas, thread, digital printing, hand & machine sewing. Courtesy of the artist. Peru. Photo by Erasmo Wong Seoane.


Come explore the exhibition "New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America," which runs from November 4 through April 6, 2015 at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York and discover the trends of South America.

Check out the Original Article on Dwell

For more information on New Territories visit MadMuseum.org

Cheers,

Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Home Tour: "Latin America's Best Modern Homes"

Home Tour quotLatin America039s Best Modern Homesquot

Photo by Matthew Williams

We already shared with you what makes Latin American design one of the best aesthetics out there in our recent blog post "What Is Latin Design?" and this article in Dwell by Kelsey Keith takes that a step further by showcasing some of the best modern homes in Latin America. Through carefully designed furniture and intricate architecture, these designers and architects truly make breathtaking homes!

Home of architect José Roberto Paredes set in the rainforest in El Salvador. Photo by Paco Perez.

Home of Ecuador based designers blending architecture into nature. Photo by Joao Canziani.


Renovated home in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Architect Nataniel Fúster designed tiles with active patterns. Photo by Raimund Koch.


Green house near coast of El Salvador captures nature at its finest. Photo by Jason Bax.


Home of photographer Reinaldo Cóser above São Paulo virtually without any walls. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.


Casa Deck by São Paulo architect Isay Weinfeld is the perfect escape from the busy city. Photo by Matthew Williams.

Home of furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti in Buenos Aires. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.


In the home above, you may notice the classic BKF chair which is one of our most popular items at Diseño. They're comfortable and give a modern yet vintage vibe once you know the history behind them. See our collection of BKF chairs here with the choice of leather or hide cover seatings!


Cheers, Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Fun Fact: Costanera Center is Santiago’s Tallest Building

Fun Fact Costanera Center is Santiagorsquos Tallest Building

Costanera Center (the tall, cylindrical one on the left) in Las Condes, Santiago, Chile

Located right in downtown Santiago, Chile, the Gran Torre Santiago building boasts all the popular stores – TopShop, Zara, Levi’s, Bobbi Brown, M.A.C., Espirit and H&M, which are all conveniently located inside the Costanera Center mall. Built in 2012, this is the tallest building in Latin America and the second tallest in the Southern Hemisphere after Australia's Q1 on the Gold Coast.

There are sixty-four floors of jewelers, bookshops, high-end fashion, electronics, department, retail, and accessories; you can even find a car yard. The structure is home to the three largest Chilean department stores Paris, Falabella, and Ripley. The parking lot is also the first in South America to use the "Find Your Car" parking technology by Park Assist making it easier to locate your car after shopping. Starbucks is outside to rejuvenate shoppers after their shopping marathon of carrying heavy bags and walking from store to store. If you’re looking for more of a meal, there are restaurants or food courts on the upper levels to satisfy your hunger. Don't really want to eat out? For patrons who love to cook, the Gran Torre Santiago even has a jumbo supermarket so you can pick up any essential groceries. If you want to turn it into an outing, there’s even a cinema, CinePlanet, often showing recent films in English. What doesn't the tallest building in Latin America have in it??

Check out the original article here!

Cheers,
Frank Campanale


updated: 5 years ago

Remodeling and Home Design