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Our Favorite Creative Shopping Bag Designs this Season


One of the most overlooked aspect of product marketability is the special packaging it comes in as this can help cultivate a following by attracting attention. These bags create enviable hype and shopping memories by bringing customers flocking into stores so they can experience the joys of displaying this intriguing modern world art.

These are way more fun to carry around and most can be reused. We've put together a few of our favorite examples from Architecture & Design that we think are eye catching and cleaver. Hope you enjoy and, of course, feel free to check out the original article here.




At Diseno we prefer simplicity with a twist. We call it the holiday gift explosion; mix and match items to make the perfect bag of gifts for your loved ones! We make it easy, place your order and then pick up your ready to go gift bag on the same or next business day!



Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 4 years ago

Latin America's Day of the Dead Celebration

Latin America039s Day of the Dead Celebration

Families gather around the graves of their loved ones at the Virgen de Lourdes cemetery in Lima, Peru (Rodrigo Abd/AP)

Dia de Los Muertos is celebrated in streets, homes, communities, universities, and parades often with large festivals including activities for children and adults. The "Day of the Dead" occurs on November 1 and 2 of each year, thus coinciding with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day.


(REUTERS/Mariana Bazo)


Dia de los Muertos or “The Day of the Dead” originated centuries ago in Mexico where it is still widely celebrated today. The blend of pre-Hispanic indigenous beliefs and Spanish Catholic beliefs are performed in honor of the dead. It is a festive, joyous time of celebration with loving rituals that are full of joy and remembrance.

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(REUTERS/David Mercado)

People around the world are drawn to the ideas and visuals of Mexico's Day of the Dead and the holiday continually gains in popularity as more people learn about it. During this time, South Americans also embrace their textiles by leaving them out so the dead can use them as blankets to rest after a long journey. It is common belief that the deceased return to their earthly homes to visit and rejoice with their loved ones during this time of the year.They're also used as picnic blankets for another common tradition of having a picnic at their loved ones' grave site.



Buy Authentic Textiles

Dia de los Muertos is celebrated as a way of cherishing connections with the unseen world. People around the world are drawn to the ideas and visuals of Mexico's Day of the Dead and the holiday continually gains in popularity as more people learn about it.


In celebration, we just recieved some awesome Guatemalan Mayan 'Day of the Dead' iconic sculptures at Diseno! They are hand-carved and painted, making each one unique, and cherishing the Latin holidays for a lifetime.

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Get the Look: A Statement Making Mud Room

Get the Look A Statement Making Mud Room

Photo by Patrick Cline/Lonny

In Hudson, Ohio this mudroom is impressive, flaunting a seriously stylish sitting/dining room with key design components:

  • Statement-making wall accents
  • Settee with a pop of color
  • Pared-down Midcentury pieces
  • Nature-inspired elements

This solicited look might seem complicated to pull off, but we've done the research for you and provided you with everything you need below!



Hand-crafted Midcentury Modern pendant light imported from Argentina





Natural Argentine cowhide rug



Custom round dining table



Vintage Textile Throws for a dash of subtle color



Patagonia Sheep Skin stool with wood base




Check out the Original article on Lonny


Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Home Tour: Alejandro Sticotti’s Buenos Aires Oasis

Home Tour Alejandro Sticottirsquos Buenos Aires Oasis

(All PHOTOS BY CRISTÓBAL PALMA)

Alejandro Sticotti is a devoted modernist who is addicted to the “natural materials, clean spaces, less is more” approach in both his furniture and building designs. After living an accomplished life with his wife, Hernaez, the couple bought a 5,400-square-foot garden outside one of the houses they were considering. After landing the sale, they set out to fulfill a lifelong dream--designing their own dream home from scratch! Slowly, after much thought, the concept of their house came together; they were building a home floating in a garden, which was not an easy task.

“I try to use simple, honest materials. I don’t like paint or plaster; I prefer to leave things as they come, and show how things are made.”

The construction uses primarly recycled materials from the local region. This helps support the local economy and keeps sourcing costs low. Inside the home there are floors of recycled pine, walls paneled in full sheets of recycled plywood, and slats salvaged from an old house in La Boca. Sticotti provided a majority of the home's decorative flourishes including a scattering of design icons—wire Bertoia chairs and a pair of cowhide-covered butterfly chairs, invented in 1939 by three Buenos Aires designers—which are a plethora of classic products.

“Reflecting that economic and architectural climate, as well as Sticotti’s own aesthetic leanings, the finished house is very much “of Argentina,” as he says. “People always say that Buenos Aires is like a European city [because of the baroque architecture and Italian heritage], but at the same time, we have our own culture, our own materials. This house is all B.A. In a way, I was trying to find something that represents us—and what we’ve got here is leather and wood and concrete.”



This building style has set a new design direction for South America as they inspire themselves as well as the rest of the world with their efficiency, use of recycled materials, and space saving innovation, all representing the newest modern design language.

Check out the original article on Dwell as well as our Pinterest which has our favorite design articles!

Cheers,
Frank Campanale


updated: 5 years ago

Getting Experimental with Design

Getting Experimental with Design

Chiachio & Giannone, Ciudad Frondosa (2011-2012)Hand embroidery; cotton, rayon, wool. Museum purchase with funds provided by Nanette L. Laitman, 2014. Argentina.

New Territories refer to the state of making artistry in today’s globalized society, a phenomenon that has helped to spur a confluence of art, design, and craft. We examine and explore this trend as we travel through several South America cities.


DFC, Casual Dinnerware (2013), Orange Crush Fiberglass Wall Console (2013), Rosario Mirror (2013) Installation view at ICFF New York, 2013. Courtesy of the artist. Mexico. Photo by David Franco.


Collaborations between small manufacturing operations and craftspersons, artists, and designers demonstrate how the resulting work addresses not only the issues of commodification and production, but also of urbanization, displacement and sustainability.


“I really wanted to focus on young designers, because that’s where I saw new dialogue growing out of tradition and legacy.” -Lowery Stokes Sims

A number of key themes include the dialogue between contemporary trends and artistic legacies in Latin American art, the use of repurposed materials in strategies of upcycling, the blending of digital and traditional skills, and the reclamation of personal and public space.


Lucia Cuba, Artículo 6, from the series Artículo 6: Narratives of gender, strength and politics (2012-2014) Cotton canvas, thread, digital printing, hand & machine sewing. Courtesy of the artist. Peru. Photo by Erasmo Wong Seoane.


Come explore the exhibition "New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America," which runs from November 4 through April 6, 2015 at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York and discover the trends of South America.

Check out the Original Article on Dwell

For more information on New Territories visit MadMuseum.org

Cheers,

Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Home Tour: Inside a Connecticut Farmhouse With Vintage Soul

Home Tour Inside a Connecticut Farmhouse With Vintage Soul


Settled into a career as the author of her lifestyle site, as well as being an interior stylist and floral designer, Amy Beth Cupp Dragoo and her husband decided to leave the city life. They sold their SoHo loft and purchased a property in the hills of Litchfield, Connecticut, for weekend getaways and rented a small postage stamp-sized apartment in New York City for the workweek.




Amy adapted to country living; she had plenty of space, was able to enojy sunrises and sunsets, and quickly learned to take design cues from Mother Nature. “I was inspired by the colors you see during winter in northwest Connecticut,” she says. “Black, gray, brown, pale blue, and stark white. By the time I added art, rugs, and scatter pillows, the vibe changed a bit, but if you stripped all of my furniture out of here, you’d see only neutrals.”



“I refer to my husband as Mr. Design Within Reach”




Amy, who has been collecting anything vintage since college, styles each room for their purpose. The kitchen has a focus on contrast, the living room is elegant, and the bedroom is dark and gloomy. We Love how Amy styles pieces of different scales and shapes them together, creating unmatched personally in this beautiful Connecticut home.



Check out the original Article here!


Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Trends We Love: Tumbling Block Patterns

Trends We Love Tumbling Block Patterns

By Catherine Dash on October 14, 2014

"The classic trompe l'oeil cube motif—most commonly associated with flooring, playing cards, throws, pillows, and wallpaper—nearly every type of home decor accent has been done in this geometric pattern."

Check out these new geometric arrivals at Diseno:

Pedal-loomed wool carpets imported from Guatemala - Carefully handmade with an unbelievable blend of wool and cotton incorporating traditional weaving techniques with modern design. We help support a better tomorrow for Guatemala by employing over 500 artisans in equal opportunity employment and creating trade opportunities.


Rombos or Doppio Pattern Cowhide Rug imported from Argentina - This geometric pattern brings out the natural texture and variation of color in the hide. Comes available in all natural colors as well as dyed colors, custom sizes available.

Guayruro Chaguar Pillow imported from Argentina - Made with native chaguar seeds & fibers known for their resistances in the rainforest, these beautiful pillows bring character to any environment. Each pillow is hand-woven with love, selecting only the best fibers.


Check out more Trends We Love or the original “Tumbling Block Patterns” article by Catherine Dash on Lonny.

updated: 5 years ago

How To: Care for your Hide

How To Care for your Hide


Each and every cowhide is unique and varies in dynamic ways. The characteristics of hides include the color, size, shape, rigidness, length of hair, coat shine, hair texture, patterns, and the dye or finish. The combination of these factors contribute to the personality of the individual hide, thus aiding in the transforming of an ordinary space into something you can call home. Hides can subtly blend into the natural setting of a rustic home, stand out in a contemporary space, or bring some texture in from the outdoors, adding in elements of warmth and style. For serious style with a capital S, our acid washed and metallic dyed hides in silver or gold finish really make a statement, bringing art and durability together. But of course we hear all the time, "how do you clean it"?




Cowhides are extremely durable and stain resistant; this makes them suitable to last for years to come with very low maintenance. Natural oils in the hair cause any liquid to bead up on the surface, essentially floating, thus allowing anything from red wine to black coffee to be quickly absorbed, removed, and dried with a cotton or paper towel. This makes it quick and easy to clean so if you spill something, don’t sweat it!

However, you must remember that cowhides are natural thus easily affected by their surrounding environment. We put together a brief guide so you can be sure with the right handling and care your hides will last for years. Always remember that it is never a good idea to wash or dry clean a hide. Getting it soaking wet or exposing it to harsh chemicals will both cause severe damage. Follow these steps to ensure your cowhide looks great and lasts:

  • Occasionally bring your cowhide outside and give it a vigorous shake. This will remove the majority of dirt and dust particles without the risk of any damage.
  • While you can vacuum as with any other rug, we suggest you do so carefully. Make sure the vacuum brush is not running and if it cannot be stopped, use the hose. Always work in the same direction as the hair.
  • A sharp object can be used to remove dried dirt or other substances, scraping in the same direction as the hair.
  • Use a mild soap and a bit of water to remove any remaining stains, then go over it using a soft brush. Once finished, dab any remaining moisture with a fresh towel.
  • If your hide needs a serious cleaning, it can be steamed. In this case seek a professional who works with leather. It is important to remember that the hide should not be soaked with excess water.


After cleaning, if the hide is damp, hang dry allowing the excess moisture to escape. If drying outside face the hair side down in order to protect it from the sun and heat. Furthermore, if you do notice any curling or wrinkling around the edges keep your hide out of direct sunlight and away from heat sources as this will cause the material to dry up. At the first signs of curling, spray some water on the skin side and gently massage the rug. Then place something heavy on top of the corner such as an encyclopedia, leave this for a day or two, and your hide will straighten itself out. We hope you enjoy these natural works of art!

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Remodeling and Home Design