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Get the Look: A Statement Making Mud Room

Get the Look A Statement Making Mud Room

Photo by Patrick Cline/Lonny

In Hudson, Ohio this mudroom is impressive, flaunting a seriously stylish sitting/dining room with key design components:

  • Statement-making wall accents
  • Settee with a pop of color
  • Pared-down Midcentury pieces
  • Nature-inspired elements

This solicited look might seem complicated to pull off, but we've done the research for you and provided you with everything you need below!



Hand-crafted Midcentury Modern pendant light imported from Argentina





Natural Argentine cowhide rug



Custom round dining table



Vintage Textile Throws for a dash of subtle color



Patagonia Sheep Skin stool with wood base




Check out the Original article on Lonny


Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Getting Experimental with Design

Getting Experimental with Design

Chiachio & Giannone, Ciudad Frondosa (2011-2012)Hand embroidery; cotton, rayon, wool. Museum purchase with funds provided by Nanette L. Laitman, 2014. Argentina.

New Territories refer to the state of making artistry in today’s globalized society, a phenomenon that has helped to spur a confluence of art, design, and craft. We examine and explore this trend as we travel through several South America cities.


DFC, Casual Dinnerware (2013), Orange Crush Fiberglass Wall Console (2013), Rosario Mirror (2013) Installation view at ICFF New York, 2013. Courtesy of the artist. Mexico. Photo by David Franco.


Collaborations between small manufacturing operations and craftspersons, artists, and designers demonstrate how the resulting work addresses not only the issues of commodification and production, but also of urbanization, displacement and sustainability.


“I really wanted to focus on young designers, because that’s where I saw new dialogue growing out of tradition and legacy.” -Lowery Stokes Sims

A number of key themes include the dialogue between contemporary trends and artistic legacies in Latin American art, the use of repurposed materials in strategies of upcycling, the blending of digital and traditional skills, and the reclamation of personal and public space.


Lucia Cuba, Artículo 6, from the series Artículo 6: Narratives of gender, strength and politics (2012-2014) Cotton canvas, thread, digital printing, hand & machine sewing. Courtesy of the artist. Peru. Photo by Erasmo Wong Seoane.


Come explore the exhibition "New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America," which runs from November 4 through April 6, 2015 at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York and discover the trends of South America.

Check out the Original Article on Dwell

For more information on New Territories visit MadMuseum.org

Cheers,

Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Product of the Week: Handmade Organic Cotton Scarves made in Guatemala

Product of the Week Handmade Organic Cotton Scarves made in Guatemala

Help support a fair trade business whose mission is to provide social and economic opportunities to indigenous artisans in Guatemala.

Since we’ve been traveling to South America, the transformation of reality is evident in their social, economic, and cultural changes. We want to help establish a more sustainable world by building trust and working together with indigenous people’s cooperatives that produce high quality handmade textiles. We saw clearly devoted ability, reliability, and fairness attributed to the high quality production in Guatemala, so we are sure with your help these artisans can have a secure income and make a dignified living.


During our last stay at Casa Santo Domingo, Guatemala we visited some of the local textile artists. We were offered an irresistible  opportunity to watch them dye cotton and wool and they set up a gas stove and pot to give us a live demonstration of the process. The natural dyes are created for the fabric from Logwood chips that are steeped and drained for about 20 minutes. Then the large pieces of raw fabric are soaked in the natural dye and after just a few minutes, it turns to a very deep purple/black color. The raw fabrics were then left to hang for a number of hours. Once dry, it can be woven into a beautiful scarf, blanket, throw, or other textiles.


It is amazing to see the dying process in person since many Americans are far detached from the processes of production. They would be astonished, seeing the way society used to accomplish the task of fabrication before people were replaced with machinery. The quality of handmade goods remains unsurpassed and these beautiful 100% cotton scarves are surly no exception.

updated: 5 years ago

Remodeling and Home Design