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Claudio Giannini: The Story of an Argentine Artist

Claudio Giannini The Story of an Argentine Artist
Over the years, we've had the pleasure of knowing and collecting art from one of Latin America's most renowned artists, Claudio Giannini. Born and raised in Buenos Aires, he started out his career as a psychologist before finally turning his passion to art. Focusing mainly on painting with acrylics on canvas, his paintings have a signature whimsicality to them using rich and bright colors to convey warmth and an easy likability. More interesting is the way Giannini perceives the connection between art and humans in which he says, "

‘All human beings need to create, it might be bread or it might be art, but for everyone it offers personal fulfillment. And the more generous we are, the greater the return – especially in art. What I paint is the here and now and I hope that everyone can see the social value in my work.’



Many of his newer collage paintings feature images of boats, cars, and planes signifying Giannini's love of traveling and the outdoors. On our recent trip to Buenos Aires, we acquired a number of these collage works as well as acrylic on canvas paintings. We're happy to share them with you now in our showroom gallery, which is on display throughout the summer.
















Giannini's artworks can be found on display in more than 30 countries around the world in both private and public collections. These exhibitions include the Alison Gallery in Miami, the Flore Kernec in Paris, the Museo del Parco in Milan, Semana del Arte Vigo in Spain, and Hazel & Sid in Connecticut. For more information on Giannini and updates on his artwork, check out his Facebook page and be sure to like it!

Cheers,
Frank Campanale


updated: 4 years ago

How To: Display Your Art

How To Display Your Art
Art brings a kind of integrity into our lives, reflecting a bit of who we are by showcasing our creativity, balance, and nature. It's not just paintings or drawings. Art includes photos, objects, textiles, and even items from nature! So what makes the perfect balance?

Here are some of the most common art displaying mistakes that can be avoided from an article we saw on Apartment Therapy. We've summarized, added some thoughts, and a few images from our clients' homes.

The basic mistakes and how to avoid them:

Art hanging too high. The most common art display mistake and the easiest to fix. Bring it down; artwork should be around or below eye level, letting everybody enjoy the stunning view.

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Applying the wrong scale. The term “go big or go home” applies here. If the piece of art doesn’t fit, don’t panic. Using a larger mat or a thicker frame can often be a quick remedy. Painting an accent color on the wall can also add scale. Always remember if it doesn’t look intentional, make it stand out.

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Matching, matching, matching.
Art isn’t about matching, it’s about being creative, free, and individual. Don’t be boring, mix up the room with colors! Show us what you love.


And think it through! We love a well done gallery wall. Here's a great technique to finding the right arrangement for your space. First, lay out the collage on the floor across a span the same size as the wall space. Then, rearrange and reorder until you find the right design. From there you can make small adjustments and hang them up!

All about variety.
Art is supposed to be fun. It brings out imagination and enlightens the mind. Have it be personal and more than just framed paintings. Use tapestries, canvases, quilts, old tools, sculptures, and other collectibles. Spice it up; nobody wants to live in a museum after all.



Leave us some space. Negative space is necessary... you need it! We think of it as a balance. Space allows rest for your eyes.

Connecting the art to the rest of the décor. Don’t be shy. The art in your home should be connected to the rest of the space, creating a more sophisticated style while also adding a layering technique. It's a form of texture, which is a benefit to any space.



Hanging properly. Tired of correcting crooked picture frames every time you come home? Well we’re tired of looking at your crooked art, just put some thought in the layout, and hang it up with two nails! Seriously. There are lots of fantastic hanging systems available online, as well as a great variety of options at your local home improvement store. Shop around for what works for you.

Being bound by the walls. Art is more than a painting that can be placed on a wall; it can be anything that expresses humanism. Keep it loose and creative. Don't worry about rules. Leaning artwork against the wall can be a great way to get the feel of something new, just having it visible to you and others in the space. Things can always be rotated and moved with ease. If you’re feeling extra creative, just place some art on shelves or on other furniture. The possibilities are endless so have fun with it and have it reflect a little of who you are!


Check out the original article on Apartment Therapy.

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Review of the MFA Exhibit "Goya: Order And Disorder"

Review of the MFA Exhibit quotGoya Order And Disorderquot

Recently I was invited by a friend to check out the latest exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts-“Goya: Order and Disorder,” a 170 piece collection comprised of Spanish painter Franciso Goya’s work. His range of work included paintings, drawings, and printmaking starting from the 1770’s lasting throughout the end of his very long life. Goya was born in 1746 and died in 1828.

“Francisco Goya is widely celebrated as the most important Spanish artist of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the last of the Old Masters and the first of the Moderns, and an astute observer of the human condition in all its complexity.”

According to the MFA, the curators decided to go for the more thematic approach when organizing the vast amount of work Goya had to offer. As a result they divided the exhibition into 8 major sections: “the nurturing and abuse of children; hunting as sport and metaphor; religious devotion and superstition; equilibrium and loss of balance; justice gone awry; and the symbolism of the giant.”

Even though these themes were prevalent throughout, what I found particularly interesting was how his work evolved through what was happening historically around him. He bridged a very long and turbulent span of time in history, experiencing both revolutions and inquisitions. His body of work showcases that he was clearly affected by it all and his experiences produce some pretty graphic and stellar work.

He painted at the height of society, painting for royalty in both Spain and France, while also depicting the grotesque, haunting, and savagery of his time. By creating such a unique juxtaposition, Goya has forced the audience to really see the depths of the society he both lived in and tried to escape. Between the years of 1797 and 1799, Goya lost his hearing, which significantly affected his life and work by adding to his inner conflicts between himself and the world he was depicting on paper.

Francisco Goya was a pioneer of his time not only in painting, but also in printmaking , and the exhibit chronicles his body of work beautifully through painting, tapestries, and prints that gives the viewer significant insight into his long and fruitful life. Take the time to check this show out!

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

The Big Flea Invades New York City

The Big Flea Invades New York City

(All photos: Kaylei McGaw / Lonny)

The "Big Flea" comes to Manhattan's soaring Pier 94!

New York City’s largest indoor flea market to date, encompasses more than 600 booths that are spread over the Pier's 100,000+ square feet with vendors selling everything from antique furniture to collectible sterling silver. We even saw vintage Hermès handbags!

Below we have an inside view of the trends and treasures from the show:



Vintage Textiles / Pillows


Classic Bar Cart / Antique Pillows / Vintage Victorian Chair


Vintage Pottery / Picture Frames / Sculptures / Antique Silverware

New York City really digs design elements, after all they have always been the genesis of fashion and interior design. You’ll find everything at this flea market as long as it’s antique, ranging from $20 pieces to high-end antique dealers.



Check out the original article on Lonny.

Cheers,
Frank Campanale


updated: 5 years ago

Getting Experimental with Design

Getting Experimental with Design

Chiachio & Giannone, Ciudad Frondosa (2011-2012)Hand embroidery; cotton, rayon, wool. Museum purchase with funds provided by Nanette L. Laitman, 2014. Argentina.

New Territories refer to the state of making artistry in today’s globalized society, a phenomenon that has helped to spur a confluence of art, design, and craft. We examine and explore this trend as we travel through several South America cities.


DFC, Casual Dinnerware (2013), Orange Crush Fiberglass Wall Console (2013), Rosario Mirror (2013) Installation view at ICFF New York, 2013. Courtesy of the artist. Mexico. Photo by David Franco.


Collaborations between small manufacturing operations and craftspersons, artists, and designers demonstrate how the resulting work addresses not only the issues of commodification and production, but also of urbanization, displacement and sustainability.


“I really wanted to focus on young designers, because that’s where I saw new dialogue growing out of tradition and legacy.” -Lowery Stokes Sims

A number of key themes include the dialogue between contemporary trends and artistic legacies in Latin American art, the use of repurposed materials in strategies of upcycling, the blending of digital and traditional skills, and the reclamation of personal and public space.


Lucia Cuba, Artículo 6, from the series Artículo 6: Narratives of gender, strength and politics (2012-2014) Cotton canvas, thread, digital printing, hand & machine sewing. Courtesy of the artist. Peru. Photo by Erasmo Wong Seoane.


Come explore the exhibition "New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America," which runs from November 4 through April 6, 2015 at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York and discover the trends of South America.

Check out the Original Article on Dwell

For more information on New Territories visit MadMuseum.org

Cheers,

Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

How To: Throw A Dinner Party

How To Throw A Dinner Party

Photographed by Megan Moss Freeman

Founder of FEED Projects, Lauren Bush Lauren, shared her recent experience with Lonny Magazine of hosting a fabulous dinner party at private dining space Kitchen Table in NYC. The purpose of the dinner was to celebrate FEED's month-long initiative in raising enough money to donate 1 million meals in 30 days to parts of the world that didn't have access to a proper meal.


For the event, the menu was simple with farm-to-table ingredients including fingerling potatoes, butternut squash, and roasted baby beets. What we loved about the article besides the delicious sounding menu was the way in which the table and room décor was set up by Kitchen Table owner Grace Park and marketing director/florist Judy Kim. Park explains, “Engaging your guests' sense of smell helps to enhance the food and adds a bit of design umami to the dinner party experience.” To do this, Park used fresh cut flowers in vintage glass bottles and the herbs used in the food to place around the table creating a sensual dining experience for every guest.



Park also offered her Top Five Tips to hosting a great dinner party and one that stood out the most to us was number three, which was "Invest in Props." She says, "Linens and a few small glass vases can dress up even a folding table, and everything looks better in candlelight." We definitely agree and thought that some of our own items might be a great addition such as our horn and silver candlesticks, vintage seltzer bottles, alpaca silver and horn serving tray, and our ceramic centerpiece bowl.





Check out the rest of Park's list here and be sure to check out those items above on our website by clicking on each picture!

Cheers and happy dining,
Frank Campanale


updated: 5 years ago

Home Tour: Inside a Connecticut Farmhouse With Vintage Soul

Home Tour Inside a Connecticut Farmhouse With Vintage Soul


Settled into a career as the author of her lifestyle site, as well as being an interior stylist and floral designer, Amy Beth Cupp Dragoo and her husband decided to leave the city life. They sold their SoHo loft and purchased a property in the hills of Litchfield, Connecticut, for weekend getaways and rented a small postage stamp-sized apartment in New York City for the workweek.




Amy adapted to country living; she had plenty of space, was able to enojy sunrises and sunsets, and quickly learned to take design cues from Mother Nature. “I was inspired by the colors you see during winter in northwest Connecticut,” she says. “Black, gray, brown, pale blue, and stark white. By the time I added art, rugs, and scatter pillows, the vibe changed a bit, but if you stripped all of my furniture out of here, you’d see only neutrals.”



“I refer to my husband as Mr. Design Within Reach”




Amy, who has been collecting anything vintage since college, styles each room for their purpose. The kitchen has a focus on contrast, the living room is elegant, and the bedroom is dark and gloomy. We Love how Amy styles pieces of different scales and shapes them together, creating unmatched personally in this beautiful Connecticut home.



Check out the original Article here!


Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Fun Fact: Thanks to this map, Latin America's importance was regenerated

 Fun Fact Thanks to this map Latin America039s importance was regenerated

Joaquín Torres García, Inverted Map of South America (1943)


South America's surprising art

Artists have been conscious of the essentially fictional status of maps and the power they possess in construing and constructing worlds. Like many, Joaquín Torres García believes mappings are not representations, but mental constructs or ideas that enable and effect change. García was determined to establish a distinctive and confident art movement in South America. In many ways, the excellent, eye-opening Radical Geometry at the Royal Academy sets out to do the same. It makes the case that the different kinds of abstract paintings and sculpture produced in Uruguay, Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela from the 1930s to the 1970s were as innovative as anything being attempted in the "north." We couldn’t say it any better than Torres:


Joaquín Torres García wrote, "We have a true idea of our position, and not as the rest of the world wishes."




“I have called this “The School of the South” because in reality, our north is the south. There must not be north for us, except in opposition to our south. Therefore we now turn the map upside down, and then we have a true idea of our position, and not as the rest of the world wishes. The point of America, from now on, forever, insistently points to the South, our north."


For more than half a century, Inverted Maps of South America have been iconic in Latin American culture. A piece that has been used to tell different stories, making the phrase, “The north is our south” ubiquitous. The image is synonymous with a country and with a style of art, constructive universalism. When we traveled to Montevideo, we saw mugs, t-shirts, erasers and even post-it notes embellished with the image of Torres Garcia’s inverted map.


For more information check out the original article here!

Cheers,
Frank Campanale

updated: 5 years ago

Product of the Week: Handmade Organic Cotton Scarves made in Guatemala

Product of the Week Handmade Organic Cotton Scarves made in Guatemala

Help support a fair trade business whose mission is to provide social and economic opportunities to indigenous artisans in Guatemala.

Since we’ve been traveling to South America, the transformation of reality is evident in their social, economic, and cultural changes. We want to help establish a more sustainable world by building trust and working together with indigenous people’s cooperatives that produce high quality handmade textiles. We saw clearly devoted ability, reliability, and fairness attributed to the high quality production in Guatemala, so we are sure with your help these artisans can have a secure income and make a dignified living.


During our last stay at Casa Santo Domingo, Guatemala we visited some of the local textile artists. We were offered an irresistible  opportunity to watch them dye cotton and wool and they set up a gas stove and pot to give us a live demonstration of the process. The natural dyes are created for the fabric from Logwood chips that are steeped and drained for about 20 minutes. Then the large pieces of raw fabric are soaked in the natural dye and after just a few minutes, it turns to a very deep purple/black color. The raw fabrics were then left to hang for a number of hours. Once dry, it can be woven into a beautiful scarf, blanket, throw, or other textiles.


It is amazing to see the dying process in person since many Americans are far detached from the processes of production. They would be astonished, seeing the way society used to accomplish the task of fabrication before people were replaced with machinery. The quality of handmade goods remains unsurpassed and these beautiful 100% cotton scarves are surly no exception.

updated: 5 years ago

Product of the Week: Our Hand Loomed Wool Carpets from Guatemala

Product of the Week Our Hand Loomed Wool Carpets from Guatemala
On our recent trip to Antigua, Guatemala, we attended the New World Crafts Fair, an annual event showcasing home decor products with a focus on incorporating traditional techniques with modern design. To us, the hit of the show were these strikingly beautiful wool carpets that we couldn't resist, incorporating aspiring color, amazing warmth, delicate texture, and striking style.


Crafted by artisans using a traditional pedal loom, these carpets are a great combination of wool and cotton that create Mayan and Hispanic inspired shapes and designs. These local weavers are committed to honoring the traditional techniques of craftsmanship that have been passed down through generations. As a result, the products preserve the Mayan culture, promote environmental and social awareness by using recycled materials, and develop sustainable trade opportunities for developing nations.


By purchasing these wool carpets, we help create sustainable communities & employment for the future of Guatemala! Help us help them, Promoting effective value chains and generating better jobs, thus reducing poverty. Help support over 500 Guatemalan artists! Carpets are currently in stock with sizes of 3x5' and 4x6' with the colors and designs shown Here. Hope you enjoy these beautiful pieces of art as much as we do!



Cheers,
Frank Campanale



updated: 5 years ago

Remodeling and Home Design